banner

The next machine was my first intercontinental sale, it also having come from Canada. It's a Bunzel Delton machine, which was advertised as being in perfect working condition.

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 1

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 2

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 3

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 4

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 5

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 6

Bunzel-Delton n 5208 picture 7

A price was agreed on, and the machine was packed by the seller, who then had it picked up by UPS. That day, I received a shocked email from the seller, because she had packed it very securely, and the dimensional weight was a manifold of the actual weight of the machine, so that the price for shipping was also far steeper than she had calculated with. We agreed that we would split the difference. When the machine arrived however, it was clear that it was not "in perfect working condition" at all. Turning the crank more than one quarter of a turn would block the machine every time. Most of the springs in the tens carry mechanism were broken, and the mechanism itself had been assembled wrong. There was simply no question that the machine could ever have worked properly or, even by an amateur, have been mistaken for one that did. I sent the seller an angry email that I would not be sending her extra money for a machine that I already overpaid, and went on to restore it, which involved the making of new springs, and a complete disassembly of the entire mechanism for cleaning and properly timed reassembly. That made the machine operable in the end. After going through all of that, to round off the restoration, I wanted to have a key made on the lock for the box, so I unscrewed the lock from the wooden box, put it in my bag, and drove to a locksmith on the motorbike. On arriving, it turned out that my bag had fallen off the bike. Meticulous searching everywhere I had passed (it wasn't far) turned up nothing - someone had picked up the bag and taken it, despite there being nothing else of value in it than that old lock, which is now sorely missing from the wooden box of the calculator. Only three times in 12 years of riding something has accidentally fallen off my bike - but this time it was really irreplaceable.